Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
:30 a.m. >> we are thrilled to have senator durbin to talk about his views on the fiscal cliff, and the framework. i think as we engage in this debate i just want to let a few things that are critical. as washington becomes obsessed with this issue. first and foremost, i think it will have consequences and that cap we have argued that the issues that are really framing the fiscal debate and fiscal cliff are ones that were actually dictated in the election context. the president didn't have one set of complications, and a second set now. really there was a thread going through the debates as was happening to add that thread was about having a balanced plan that addressed america's fiscal challenges. acknowledged there were serious fiscal challenges that we do need long-term, deficit reduction. that's important for america's credibility, and it's important for america's economy and economic growth. that plan has to be balanced and that means significant revenues, and it has to go around. typically that means the wealthy and well off have to pay their fair share as well. again, th
critical in the fiscal cliff discussion is we are talking about the patch for the 2012 tax year. unlike the rest of the fiscal cliff, which affects tax rates that will play next year, the patch applies to the return that we will all have to file early next year. so if there is not congressional action here, there is an abrupt increase in tax on the 2012 taxable year in 20 of 11 approximately 4 million people paid the amt. if there's not a patch, 30 million people will be required to pay the amt in 2012 for the current taxable year and they will pay an additional $90 billion in tax. very few of them have any idea. >> host: is the irs prepared? >> guest: the irs took a fairly unusual -- but i think correct position. they took the position that congress will do the responsible name. so they did their tax program for next year, for the 2012 return, assuming congress would enact the patch before the end. i think that was a reasonable thing to do because i believe they will do that. however, it does mean if there is not a patch, the tax return idling season next year would be quite chaotic. >
are talking about the patch about the 2012 taxable year, and unlike the fiscal cliff that affects tax rates that apply next year, the patch applies to the return that we will all have to file early next year. if there is not congressional action here, there is the abrupt increase in tax on the 2012 taxable year under -- in 2011, approximately 4 million people paid the amt. if there's not a patch, 30 # million people will be required to pay in 2012, and for the current taxable year, and they will pay app additional $90 billion in tax. none of them -- few of them have any idea that this is on the table. >> host: is the isr prepared? >> guest: the irs took a fairly unusual, but i think correct position, taking the position that congress will do the responsible thing so they did their tax programming for next year for the 2012 return, assuming congress would enact the patch before the end of the year. if -- i think that was the reasonable thing to do because almost -- even i believe they will do that -- however, it does mean if there's not a patch, the tax return filing season next year will be
the fiscal cliff negotiations and peace in the middle east. >> is everyone okay with that? [inaudible conversations] [laughter] we are talking about what extent a middle-class tax breaks for me to middle-class families. today at 2:00 p.m., people can ask the president questions on twitter with the hash tag my 2k. after that, this come in this afternoon from the president has a bilateral meeting with the prime minister of bulgaria and this is an important relationship with bulgaria. the president will deliver a speech about 4:00 p.m. commemorating the 20th anniversary of the threat reduction program, which as you know, was authored by richard lugar. it has resulted in a regime that allows us to achieve our the president's highest priorities, and that is to secure safety around the world. it is important have to remember that when it comes to these kinds of objectives, democrats and republicans, we can come together and see very important things come and the president looks forward to this. we also want you extend our congratulations to the duke and duchess of cameras that they are expe
secretary geithner toward fixing the fiscal cliff that's been so much talked about. and i just want to say, sadly, that the facts are that real numbers disprove what they have alleged the plan would do. and we've look the at the numbers. there's no real mystery about this. and there are gimmicks and manipulations in the way they've expressed what they intend to accomplish that i think are beyond the pale and the american people need to know that it's not accurate. this would not be possible if we had the plan on the floor so it could be voted on in the light of day. but we all know what the plan is, the scheme is, the strategy is. it is to be meeting in secret, and then plop down on the floor of the senate at the last hour some sort of coerced agreement that all the senators, like lemmings, are supposed to vote for. and we're supposed to expect that the american people will believe the agreement is what the president says it is, but that is not in reality what's occurring. he's been -- secretary geithner -- meeting with senate -- house members, particularly last week. he presented a propos
, before we talk about fiscal cliff, we'll get because the last fiscal cliff. we had another fiscal cliff types of new with the debt limit to create a center that led to this ridiculous idea that i voted against that let's put a bunch of bad things to happen at one time because that will force washington to do something. surprise, it didn't work. here we are again. so we have to issues. number one is an immediate term to avoid doing damage. that's to avoid doing harm. so we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short term. then we have had a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order it's just fundamentally true. we spend a trillion dollars a year more than we take in to assist attack. i approached this issue that the only way we can get that in order is to rapid economic growth. there's no taxes to raise. what the presidential post does not raise enough revenue, but it will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class job creation. so that's why i oppose this blanket instead i think we should do real tax reform. if there are loopholes, there's a loophole fo
, again, working together to solve these problems. the issue before us on the fiscal cliff, i also wanted to address briefly if i could and that is with regard to the discussions ongoing about taxes and what we should do. and i just wanted to take this opportunity to talk a little about why some of us believe that raising tax rates would be counterproductive at a time when our economy is -- is so weak and there is another opportunity here and that's for tax reform. the jobs crisis and the debt crisis are linked and the president's made that pointed. he sai-- and the president's mat point. he said that his priority in the grand bargain discussions, the fiscal cliff discussions is to make sure that we encourage economic growth and jobs and so we should use this as an opportunity to address the underlying problem as that are holding back our economy. an economy that's in tough shape today. unemployment is still stuck just below 8%. the projections c.b.o. have given us for next year, by the way, are continued anemic growth in the economy and, in fact, unemployment actually going up, not down.
the consequences of going over the fiscal cliff. and, madam president, i've only been here 36 years, but i've seen every president willing to meet on a regular basis at budget-crunch time with people on both sides of the table over and over and over again until they gradually whittle it down to where they agree. i haven't seen that with president obama. i've seen heard democrats complain that he never talks to them. we cannot do this kind of work without very, very strong presidential effort. that's what presidents are for. and it can't just be laying down a gauntlet sand say, you can't -- and say, you can't cross over that, or drawing a line in the sand. we need -- you got two programs now. and those two sides need to get together. and that includes the president and whatever democrats he cares to put in the equation and also speaker boehner, leader mcconnell, and others. as we attempt to reach a meaningful resolution of this debate in the coming weeks, there are three guideposts that i will keep in sight. first is the cliff itself. going over it would be the height of irresponsibility. and accor
with all the frenzy about the fiscal cliff that we have a history and some of that history is successful in resolving the deep seated choices within the budgeting. that is what we are going to look back and talk about today and see whether we can learn any lessons from that experience. we will go over the detailed program and a few minutes but i want first to introduce our keynote speaker tom davis many of you know and most of you know tom. thomas somebody i call a academic. he's covered many bases and was the county executive for fairfax county. he was the representative to washington from fairfax to the congress and became the chairman of the house government operations committee with many important hearings and covered many issues and he remains very active as a speaker and policy observer and he's also on our faculty where he teaches the course on southern politics very popular lecture and faculty member so i'm pleased to have, as a colleague. tom is going to kick it off and then come back and talk about the detailed program and get started. >> paul, thank you very hatch. he left of
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9